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State Flags

Texas Flag


Texas Flag History

Adopted: January 25, 1839 (by the Republic of Texas)

Texas Flag Readopted: August 31, 1933 (De facto use 1879–1933)

Texas Flag Design: 1/3 of the hoist is blue containing a single centered white star. The remaining field is divided horizontally into a white and red bar.

Designed by Peter Krag

 

Design of the Lone Star Flag

The Consultation, meeting in November 1835, avoided an outright declaration of independence for Texas, choosing instead to support the Mexican Constitution of 1824 and demanding separate statehood for Texas within the Mexican Confederation. The delegates approved an interim "Organic Law" setting up a provisional government and chose three commissioners to go to the United States to plead their cause, gain financial support, prepare military units, fit out ships, and generally solicit U.S. government's recognition for the proposed Texian government.

The commissioners, Stephen F. Austin, William H. Wharton, and Branch T. Archer, soon realized that their cause would be considerably strengthened by an outright declaration of independence from Mexico. Their flag designs submitted to the revolutionary government reflect a strong commitment to a country tied to Anglo-American tradition, with a nod to Mexican ties in the red, white, and green colors of the second design.

 

Blue and white Texas flag design

Texas Flag Design Submitted to the Texas Government Handwriting of Stephen F. Austin

Blue and white Texas flag design

Idea for an independent flag - The shape of the english Jack in the corner indicates the origin of the North American people. The stripes indicate the immediate descent of the most of the Texians. H[torn] Texas-the tri colour is Mexican.

 

Red, white, and green Texas flag design

Texas Flag Design Submitted to the Texas Government Handwriting of Stephen F. Austin

Red, white, and green Texas flag design

Mottos in center:

"Where Liberty dwells there is my country."
"WASHINGTON-In his example there is safety"

In place of the star, put the sun with the head of Washington in the center, and rays, representing the light of liberty, radiating all round-outside of this and above, put the motto "Where Liberty dwells there is my country"---change the stripes from green to blue & have exactly thirteen of them [text scribbled over]-the stripes will then be blue and white-change the ground of the Jack in the corner from white to yellow, or leave it white.



Flag Design Submitted to the Texas Government Handwriting of Stephen F. Austin, B.T. Archer, and William Wharton

Flag Design Submitted to the Texas Government Handwriting of Stephen F. Austin, B.T. Archer, and William Wharton

Either will do, either will make a handsome Texas Jack, which old grand Father John Bull need not be ashamed, or unwilling to acknowledge.

This flag is approved of by is and we recommend its adoption

S.F. Austin
B.T. Archer

I object much to the hackneyed quotation "Where liberty dwells there is my country. Its frequent use by schoolboys as a motto & by Volunteer companies in their banners have rendered it stale & fulsome. Virgil from whom it is taken expresses the sentiment antithetically. In the latin language it has much point & beauty. Ubi Libertas-Ibi Patria. If we are to have it all let us have it expressed in this way. But I should much prefer that the expression motto be discarded & that the words The light of liberty or the words Lux Libertatis if they are preferred be substituted. The light of Liberty apply to the sun. Underneath Washington I would have the words "In his example there is safety" With this alteration
I am much pleased with the banner

W'm. H. Wharton

I have no objection to the Motto Lux Libertatis, or Light of Liberty-

S.F. Austin

 

Texas Flag and Seal Design by Peter Krag, approved January 25, 1839

This original color design sketch by Peter Krag shows the Texas flag and seal for the Republic of Texas. It was approved on January 25, 1839 and signed by Mirabeau Lamar, President of the Republic of Texas; John M. Hansford, Speaker of the Texas House of Representatives; and David Burnet, President of the Texas Senate.

Texas Flag and Seal Design by Peter Krag, approved January 25, 1839

 

Detail of Texas Seal

Detail of Texas Seal

 

Detail of signature, President Mirabeau Lamar

Detail of signature, President Mirabeau Lamar

 

Detail of signatures, John M. Hansford and David Burnet

Detail of signatures, John M. Hansford and David Burnet

 

TEXAS FLAG DESCRIPTION

Sec. 3100.002.  TEXAS FLAG DESCRIPTION:  IN GENERAL.  (a)  The state flag is a rectangle that:

(1)  has a width to length ratio of two to three;  and

(2)  contains:

(A)  one blue vertical stripe that has a width equal to one-third the length of the flag;

(B)  two equal horizontal stripes, the upper stripe white, the lower stripe red, each having a length equal to two-thirds the length of the flag;  and

(C)  one white, regular five-pointed star:

(i)  located in the center of the blue stripe;

(ii)  oriented so that one point faces upward;  and

(iii)  sized so that the diameter of a circle passing through the five points of the star is equal to three-fourths the width of the blue stripe.

(b)  The red and blue of the state flag are:

(1)  the same colors used in the United States flag;  and

(2)  defined as numbers 193 (red) and 281 (dark blue) of the Pantone Matching System.

(c)  The red, white, and blue of the state flag represent, respectively, bravery, purity, and loyalty.

Added by Acts 2001, 77th Leg., ch. 1420, Sec. 7.001, eff. Sept. 1, 2001.

 

Pledge of Aallegiance and Texas Flag Protocol

The pledge of allegiance to the state flag is as follows:

"Honor the Texas flag; I pledge allegiance to thee, Texas, one state under God, one and indivisible."

The pledge was instituted by the Texas Legislature in 1933, and originally referred to the "Texas flag of 1836" (which was the Burnet Flag, and not the Lone Star Flag then in use). In 1965, the error was corrected by deleting the words "of 1836." In 2007, the phrase "one state under God" was added. The addition of "under God" has been challenged in court, though an injunction was denied.

According to The Handbook of Texas Online, "In 1933 the legislature passed a law establishing rules for the proper display of the flag and providing for a pledge to the flag: "Honor the Texas Flag of 1836; I pledge allegiance to thee, Texas, one and indivisible." The pledge erroneously referred to the 1836 national flag, known as David G. Burnet's flag, instead of the Lone Star Flag. Senator Searcy Bracewell introduced a bill to correct this error in 1951, but the legislature did not delete the words "of 1836" until 1965."

The pledge was again amended by House Bill 1034 during the 80th Legislature with the addition of "one state under God." The revised wording became effective on June 15, 2007.

 

NOT ALL TEXAS STATE FLAGS ARE THE SAME!

HERE'S WHY...

Extra care is taken in making these flags. Flag designs are researched to ensure that they are authentic and current. We use sturdy fabrics, allowing the flags to be flown outdoors, indoors, or carried in parades.

Choose Heavy Duty Nylon (digital dyed) or 2-ply Polyester Material (screen dyed) to meet the most demanding commercial and residential uses.

  • All outdoor flags are finished with heavy duty thread, polyester heading, brass grommets and four needle fly hem
  • State flags constructed to precise specifications
  • Flies in the slightest breeze
  • Proudly Made In The USA
  • Beautiful Presentation - This Texas Flag makes an excellent gift for friends, parents or to PROUDLY display on your HOME or OFFICE.

 
HEAVY DUTY NYLON OUTDOOR STATE FLAGS WITH SOLAR SHIELD


Our most popular and versatile outdoor Texas flag, USA Flag Co. flags offer the optimum combination of elegance and durability for every purpose. The 100% nylon material provides a rich, lustrous appearance. Our flags have superb wearing strength due to the material’s superior strength-to-weight ratio, and will fly in the slightest breeze. State flags are finished with strong, polyester canvas headings and spurred brass grommets and four needle fly hem. The result is a flag that will be flown with pride year after year.

SOLAR SHIELD

  • Rich, Vivid Colors
  • Durable
  • Fire-Resistant
  • Mothproof
  • Mildew Resistant
  • Sheds Water
  • Lightweight for Flyability

 
HEAVY DUTY 2-PLY POLYESTER OUTDOOR STATE FLAGS


The strongest, longest lasting material, developed for maximum durability in strong wind conditions and intense sun. USA Flag Co. polyester flags are made of tough 2-ply 100% spun polyester. They stand up to unpredictable weather conditions. Each Texas flag is finished with tough polyester canvas heading and spurred brass grommets and four needle fly hem.

  • Heavy 2-Ply Yarns for Extra Strength and Durability
  • Withstands Wind, Sun, Dirt, and Moisture
  • Outlasts Nylon and Other Acrylic Flags
  • Excellent for Industrial / Institutional Use

Add this Texas Flag to your cart for Immediate Delivery Now.


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G.T.

Hawaii Flag

L.

Very pleased with my purchase. Several compliments on my Massachusetts flag from passersby.

R
R.D.
Proud Okie

I love it. Even though I’m in Calif now, Oklahoma is still my home. The flag is beautiful.